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Professional vs Amateurs

With the recent inquiries and new inflow of potential customers, we noticed that BJJ is a lot more
popular.

We do enjoy the attention and we had to put a limit on the number one new students.

Bare in mind, the limit is only on new students and we always will keep our doors open for our old students that want to make a come back.

Actually, Mathew just came back training after taking a year off to do a welding course.

Reasons for the limit: quality of teaching (ratio of teacher and students) and safety (too many students on the mats).

So the question is why do we have so many queries and new students?

We have been in Epsom for 2 years (2 years in Onehunga prior) and did not experience the same influx of students last new year.

Are we too cheap?

Is our "no contract policy" enticing all this "new" attention?

Is the blog/website getting too popular?

I already know the answers for the above.

Yes, we are offering something else and get the attention of the market.

Stu and myself teach BJJ on an amateur level as we have a day time job,

If you read my past blogs, you could think I am against professional BJJ instructors.

http://www.aucklandbjj.com/2014/01/the-wolves-of-jiu-jitsu.html

http://www.aucklandbjj.com/2013/12/the-biggest-mind-trick-of-bjj-creonte.html


It is actually not correct.

I think there is a need for professional instructors and contracts:

Rental in Auckland is expansive.

Each mats cost at least NZD 100 per square meter.

If you want a space that you do not have to lay the mats every time,

Then you cannot sub lease the space for the rest of the day.

So you are looking at 2-5 classes per week for a room that you cannot cover the cost of your lease:

Expensive.

Then you have to think about the instructors:

If he is an amateur, he will work 8 hours and then turn up to teach BJJ.

It is not ideal as they might be tired and do not pay full attention.

To counter that, in Auckland BJJ we created a full curriculum for every 6 months to ensure that we plan every classes and topics.

So give a try to a professional instructor and think of the cost of running a BJJ gym because judging their fees.


Check out our links.

If your gyms is not in there, please send us an email and we will add you.

http://www.aucklandbjj.com/p/other-auckland-clubs.html

http://www.aucklandbjj.com/p/new-zealand-clubs.html







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